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and east jerusalem. aapparently in response to the u.n. general assembly win by the palestinians last thursday. joining us now as he does every sunday at this time, former united states ambassador to the u.n. john bolton. also a fox news contributor. good morning, ambassador. >> guest: good morning, eric. glad to be with you. >> eric: as always. of course. the u.n. vote, does it really instead make peace more difficult and compromise more complicated in that region? >> guest: absolutely. this vote was fundamentally illegitimate. there is no palestinian state. there is nothing that meets the custnary international law definition. the palestinian authority violated the oslo accord trying to change the status of the west bank and gaza through a means other than negotiation. i have to say it was a vote that could have been won by the united states and israel. but that, leave it for another day. i think israel is responding appropriately. i think that the initial israeli reaction sort of shuts the whole thing off was a mistake. this is a serious problem. and i think they are well within th
? >> no, she did not. i asked her a wide range of questions ranging from why she agreed as u.n. ambassador to go on the shows in the first place since that position, like secretary of state, is not detailed campaigning, to more detailed questions on why she blamed the attacks on the video, why she said there was a protest when there wasn't. it was really a wide-ranging discussion. >> greta: was her inability to answer some of the questions, did you get the sense -- i realize it's sort of a sense -- she didn't want to answer them or didn't have the information or was there some other reason? >> frankly, i found her to be very defensive and not very forthcoming. i asked her, for example, why she maintains that it had been a protest that evolved into an attack when the president of libya had been on right before her and had said they'd already arrested 50 people, that they were extremists, that they were people with ties to al-qaeda, that some of them had come from mali, and that they -- that it had been a premeditated attack. her answer to that in particular was really unsatisfactory. she ba
and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before pa
with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before panetta made his remarks to the i
's the pour nou ya from the u.n. >> explain it. >> the notion that the u.n. is going to come in and tell us what to do. the fact of the matter is this treaty raises the world to the standard of the u.s. doesn't require the u.s. to change its standards at all and doesn't in any way give the u.n. power to do anything in this country. but i think it's -- all you have to do is say u.n. and people on the right get very ex or sized. rick santorum helped lead the opposition to this treaty. i think he's out of step with the american people, out of step by the way on this tax cuts for the rich stuff. you know, bobby jindal said today and i that you say it was remarkable, we're in danger of becoming the party that defends the rich, anti-medicare, antisocial security, and there's no future in that kind of republican party nor is there one in a party that's anti-handicapped. >> let me go to john on this because you and i, john, i think we all know people in our business, in the journalism world, and in consulting who have handicaps, they are in wheelchairs but they raise a ruckus effectively if there's
here at the u.n., it is the u.s. and israel leading against the rest of the world. a u.n. vote on the official membership of palestinians, the vote that the u.s. and israel have been spending a long time trying to stop. the question is, what effect will this have on anything approaching peace in that region? our chief correspondent affairs, andrea mitchell. >> reporter: good evening, on the 65th anniversary of the u.n. giving israel the land to become a state, they voted overwhelmingly to recognize the palestinians, but only as an observer state. and a non-voting official state it is a step for nationhood, and a potential flash place for the middle east. hours earlier, they were already celebrating across the west bank. in ramallah, he made a pizza with tomatoes, olives, and spinach, representing the palestinian flag >> this is what we longed for over 60 years, it is about time a flag that today's u.n. actions will still not make palestine a nation. >> the united nations general assembly is here to issue a birth certificate of the reality of the state of palestine. >> reporter:
's u.n. vote this afternoon. >>> and supermarket sweep, biden style. >> i got my own. my wife who never let me have one before. she doesn't trust me. >> the vice president loads up on his holiday shopping during opening day at washington's first costco. >> walking through this store just get foot. calling for guidance. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington right now at the white house, the political power lunch of 2012. president obama and mitt romney meeting for the frts time privately since the campaign after having been together serve times overall, including three debates. ruth marcus, and kristin welker. kristin what are they saying about the private lunch? not much, i guess? >> reporter: not a lot, andrea. they're tamping down expectations. jay carney saying there's no formal agenda to this lunch. of course president obama, during his victory speech in chicago, said he wanted to sit down, talk to mitt romney about his views how to move the country forward. you have to assume that would include a robust discussion of the fiscal cliff, given that is what lawmakers are
. >> to vote for anything that is even perceived to be granting the u.n. power is a dangerous game for a republican senator because the u.n. is so unpopular among the republican base. >> jon: oh, my god. ( laughter ). it's official-- republicans hate the united nations more than they like helping people in wheelchairs. ( laughter ) look, i'm willing to keep an open mind here. what are your ( bleep ) reasons for opposing this? >> we already have the most comprehensive disability rights laws and protections in the world. period. >> it is considered to be the gold standard for the disabled. >> jon: right. so by signing this, we are, through our moral leadership and hope beaconing, encourages the other signatories in the world to live up to the only standard that never loses value... gold. ( laughter ). i don't get it. it can't just be you reject trying to get other countries to live up to america's ideals. that can't be it. show us something else, maybe nay size crazy. >> it's with grave concern for sovereignty that i oppose this u.n. treaty. >> the treaty could be used to interfere
palestinian status at the u.n.; reading the fine print; tackling immigration reform and re-purposing digital data gathered during the campaign. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street tracked the ups and downs of the fiscal cliff drama in washington today. at one point, the dow jones industrial average was off more than 100 points. but stocks made up the ground after the president's talk of a deal by christmas. the dow ended with a gain of nearly 107 points to close at 12,985. the nasdaq rose 24 points to close well over 2,991. a moderate republican senator susan collins of maine voiced new concerns today about u.n. ambassador susan rice. it stemmed from rice's initial account, on a sunday talk show, of the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. at the time, she said it began as an anti-american protest, but she now says she was working off faulty intelligence. rice met with collins for 90 minutes today, but afterward the senator remained critical. >> i still have many questions that remain unanswered. i continue to be troubled by
. but my guest is worried that the u.n. is focusing on this when this is going on. what is going on here? >>guest: well, the u.n. is acting less and less like a bull washington against war, the real purpose and more and more as a mechanism to redistribute wealth and power, away from free societies and toward dictatorships. >>neil: maybe they are hanging their hat on this possibility of russia playing a role in getting assad to step down but that at best is wish will thinking, i think, and hanging your hopes on not having a backbone if you can get a back door deal with the guy who is kill all the people. >> russia has been supplying the assad regime with weapons. russia is one of the worst players in the middle east. in fact, it is very hard to come up with anything positive. russia has contributed to the middle east in living memory. i can't think of anything. >>neil: the united nations will do what? they get involved in all these other ridiculous time consuming wasteful enterprises and this is fat more immediate crisis. >>guest: what is going on is something we really should be asking,
to demand north korea exercise restraint and will likely refer to a u.n. security council resolution banning such activity. they're also expected to discuss plans of action in case the launch happens. the diplomats are likely to request the security council to issue a strong condemnation. >>> police in central japan are trying to find some clues as to why a highway tunnel collapsed. they've searched the headquarters of the company that operates the highway. police suspect officials with central nippon expressway of professional negligence resulting in injury or death. officers also searched a maintenance facility and four other locations. hundreds of concrete panels fell from the tunnel's ceiling on sunday. they crushed three vehicles. nine people were killed. expressway officials say some of the bolts used to attach panels to the ceiling became loose. workers completed the tunnel in 1977. company officials say they have no records to indicate any bolts were ever replaced. they say crews only conducted visual checks. experts studying the collapse say the fact that the concrete ceiling slabs
as a result of rising prices and mounting attacks on un vehicles delivering supplies. the u.n. world food program is currently feeding one, 5 million people in syria, the vast majority displaced from their homes. the news comes after the u. n announcing they are cutting back and removing staffers from damascus. among the latest victims of violence in syria, nine students and a teacher were killed when their school was bombed in damascus. government forces have blamed rebels for the attack. nato has approved a request by turkey for the deployment of patriot missiles to its border with syria. turkey sought the missiles to defend itself from cross border violence. speaking in belgium, anders fogh rasmussen says the patriot missiles would serve as a deterrent to syria. >> i do believe that a deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent, and that way the escalate this situation along the syrian-turkish border. the mere fact that the patriot missiles have been deployed make it necessary for any potential aggressor to think twice before they even consider attacking turkey.
to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of a contentious presidential election campaign by agreeing to go on the sunday shows. -- to present the administration's position. >> main republican senator susan collins after hearing from u.n. ambassador susan rice on capitol hill. she also tried to tie susan rice to the 1998 embassy bombings in kenya and tanzania. now, for a while it looked like senators graham mccain were going to give her past, but then she went up there to talk to these folks. why would she do that, nina? >> i don't know, but they keep moving the bar on her. initially they said did not like what she said, then petraeus said these are the facts we gave her but now a senator collins says she should not have gone on television at all. nobody said that about condoleezza rice when she used to go on sunday talk shows all the time to represent the administration's position, including an election year, and said things that were later proven to be not true that she may not have known that. she probably di
.s. will refer the matter to the u.n. security council if they go ahead with the launch. >> we will be prepared to work with our partners, including at the united nations security council, to respond in a swift, effective, and credible manner. >> davies said the u.s. could strengthen sanctions. he said existing penalties have already hampered north korea's nuclear program. davies has been holding discussions with his counterparts from china, as well japan and south korea. he said he hopes the chinese can use their influence with their allies in pyongyang. u.s. diplomats have made similar warnings over the years and the north koreans have ignored them. >> reporter: the ballistic missile launch will be the second since kim jong-un took pow area year ago. it will use the same launch pad at a site in the northwestern part of the country. before the first test in april, officials in pyongyang said the 30-meter, three-stage rocket was meant to carry a satellite. but japan, the united states and south korea said the launch was in fact a ballistic missile test. the test ended in failure with the rocket
. >> the u.n. ambassador got a very public vote of confidence, and even a round of applause, yesterday when she and other cabinet members met at white house. she got the backing of the woman she might replace. >> susan rice has done a great job as our ambassador to the united nations. >> it was a totally different story over on the hill, where the day after john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly ayotte tried to drive a stake through rice's nomination chances, susan colins and bob corker rose up out of the ground to sink they're teeth into her. "the washington post" today reports a white house official and democratic aides say they think rice could win senate confirmation from the top diplomatic job if obama nominated her. however the piece note her confirmation could come at a high political cost as lawmakers negotiate a deal on taxes and entitlement reform. and nbc news reports the president has yet to make up his mind over whether he will select rice or massachusetts senator, john kerry. but they say the clock is ticking and a nominee might be announced as early as next week. wow. that's -
near damascus international airport. i should bear in mind, reuters reporting that two u.n. austrian peace-keepers were wounded, not life threateningly, but wounded near damascus airport. not clear by who. but that comes as reports of free syrian army rebels moving towards the airport within two kilometers, perhaps. emirates and egyptair cancelling flights until further notice, saying for the safety of the staff. and yesterday closed due to maintenance. something is certainly happening in that very significant airport to the east. that will be causing great tension in damascus. that link to the internet shut off and cell phones being down, as well. we can't tell. but certainly today for the first time i think in quite a number of weeks things are definitely changing on the ground of damascus and it looks like it's in the favor of the rebels. ashleigh? >> and i just want to be absolutely clear, you're coming to us from beirut at this moment, keeping a close eye. i know that our reporters who are based in lebanon next door to syria are trying at all times to get in and out of that coun
of the airport, now, all of this happens as the u.n. is warning after human catastrophe in syria and more than 40,000 people killed and the u.n. is saying now that nearly 700,000 syrians have been displaced and that could grow this winter as the violence continues, ands winter is starting to set in, to the human, the human effect of this is really starting to take a toll on syria and the wider region, there are refugees in turkey and jordan and causing huge problems, but the violence is continuing to escalate, and right now, kelly, it doesn't appear that there's any end in sight. >> kelly: all right. connor, connor powell reporting from jerusalem about the developments in syria and we're all very concerned about what's happening there. thank you, jamie? >> on the heels of that look at the middle east situation, let's get back to one of our top stories, new settlement construction in east jerusalem and the west bank after a successful bid at the united nations this week, gaining them nonmember observer state status. listen to secretary of state hillary clinton on that. >> we have to convince pales
on the 31st? chris will get to the bottom of it. the u.n. votes and the palestinians could not be happier. more ahead. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >>neil: party time not members after the united nations voted for palestinian statehood despite america's vocal disapproval of threat to defund the u.n. and john bolton, our former ambassador, joins
there will be only observer status. to become a member you need u.n. security council and that won't happen because the u.s. will veto it. the u.s. and israel tried hard to get palestine not to go along with today's vote. but they are now down playing it it doesn't give palestine what it wants. it's quiet this morning outside the u.n. but demonstrators are expected to protest the vote on palestinian recognition. palestinians are seeking status as a nonmember observer. palestinians say they need u.n. recognition of a palestinian state in the west bank in order to get israel back to the negotiating table. the u.s. insists on direct negotiations with israel. >> the path to a two state solution is through jerusalem and ramallah, not new york. >> reporter: they recognized the palestine 1977 borders before israel fought and won part of palestinian land. >> we know the occupation will not disappear, we know that there might be certain consequences because israel wants to punish us. >> reporter: president abbas is preparing a speech before the vote. he's hoping to gain support here at the u.n. and at home.
agree to cease-fire there is tension in the region. this time it's over the u.n. vote. granting the palestinian liberation organization nonmember observer state status. how does the latest mover impact the power of peace talk between israel and palestinians? joining us to talk about that, former israeli ambassador pinkus. thank you for your time today. israel signaled the u.n. vote they say will delay efforts at peace talks. how so? >> there doesn't seem to be chance of peace after the election, it's dim. combine that or complementbe that with the fact that the palestinians are divided between hamas controlled gaza strip and palestinian authority controlled west bank. you know, the recipe or chances for a peace process look extremely remote. if you look at the u.n. vote, shannon, and what are the immediate implications in one word it's nothing. in four words it's a lot of trouble. >> shannon: well, there were only nine votes no against recognition of that particular status. of course, the u.s., israel, canada and others. what do you think it says about the u.s. and about israel'
best november since 1973. in syria, the u.n. announced it is pulling out non-essential international staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was ful
on a two-state solution. >> israeli announcement comes hours after the u.n. voted overwhelmingly to grant palestine a non-member observer status. john ray from our british broadcasting partner itn is live in tel aviv. john, good day to you. first up, what is the effect of the settlement announcement? and will israel really move forward with these plans? >> well, you could really hear and see and feel the frustration in hillary clinton's words there, couldn't you? the reason is because, if there are people who still believe in the meaningful prospect of peace settlement, these have been a very depressing couple of days here. the u.n. votes in favor of the palestinian status upgrade and then this countermeasure from the israelis. let me be clear about this. this comes in two chunks. first of all the 3,000 homes the israelis say they will now build. that will come within existing settlements on the occupied west bank, and possibly extending some of those settlements. it would also be within the arab east part of jerusalem. again, extending existing settlements. but the really controversial p
of ramallah after a history-making vote at the u.n. it granted status to nonmember observer state. what does that really mean to both sides? i will talk to the chief palestinian negotiator and to israel's ambassador to the u.n. >>> we begin with the ultimate power lunch at the white house. president obama and mitt romney face-to-face for the first time since the election and talk about a picture's worth 1,000 words. try a million for this one. only one word really you need which is awkward. just after this lunch took place, the president offered a tough fiscal cliff proposal to congress, one that aides to john boehner say -- wait for it -- he's already rejected. of course he has. joining me to talk about all things politics, "new york times" columnist frank bruni and ross doufit. how many seconds was it, do you think, gentlemen, let me start with you, frank, before john boehner rejected out of hand president obama's attempt to try and do a fiscal cliff deal? >> with $1.6 trillion in new taxes, i think probably half a second. >> when you see the apparent attempt at a bipartisan lunch going on
precautions to protect the ambassador. jon: u.n. ambassador susan rice has been under fire for weeks for her public response to the attack. the ambassador calling it spontaneous and not linking it to terrorism in and several television interviews. however, dianne feinstein is coming to the ambassador's defense, saying that the talking points she was given were wrong. >> i do not believe the intelligence communities should prepare these talking points. i think additionally somebody should have picked up the phone and called and said, tell me the story, what happened. jon: congressman rogers is not convinced. he suggests that someone in the obama administration simply try to change the story. >> it really is beyond the talking points and susan rice. it was a political narrative designed not around what the intelligence said, but what about the best politics were for them. jon: joining us now to help break this down is bret baier. the interesting thing in one of those sound like i'm jim -- the interesting thing in one of those sound bites is what she should have talked about on morning televisi
at the u.n. yesterday u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, said the resolution would only delay the peace process. >> today's unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. today's vote should not be misconstrued by any as constituting eligibility for u.n. membership. it does not. this resolution does not establish that palestine is a state. >> a leading concern for israel is that the palestinians could now use the status to access the u.n.'s international criminal court, pressing it to investigate israel's practices in the occupied territories. >>> in washington, lawmakers are already threatening to cut millions of dollars in aid to the palestinians should they use their new status to go after israel. >>> the united states senate is ready to consider broad new economic sanctions against iran. and they are aimed at choking off that country's energy and shipping sectors that are believed to keep its nuclear program afloat. yesterday the u.s. gave tehran a march deadline to begin cooperating with a u.n. nuclear investigation. the agency
states why he thinks -- why his country thinks the u.n.'s possibly interaction is a bad idea. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with today's hard words in the negotiations to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. that steep across the board spending cut and tax increase scheduled to hit in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it ne
. jenna: well do you like your internet just open and free. jon: i do, that's how i prefer it. jenna: a u.n. agency wants to -- well, maybe oversee the internet a little bit, create some new laws maybe for the internet. jon: they are so good at running things they are. jenna: there is an idea out there that the u.n. may put in some sort of new regulation for the internet. are they the right people to do it? what about sensor ships. big questions for our country and the web. we'll tell you about it next hour. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain th
that resulted in the voting down of a u.n. treaty aimed at spreading rights for disabled people. even the venerable bob dole could not bring both sides together on this one. also major unrest in egypt as 100,000 protesters stormed the palace in cairo forcing president morsi to flee. we'll update you on the situation there. but first our top story live here at 5:30 a.m. at 30 rock in new york city. and we begin with the latest on the rapidly approaching fiscal cliff deadline of automatic tax hikes on everybody and what appears to be a stalemate in the negotiations. in his first interview since the election, president obama reiterated his demand that any deal must raise taxes on the highest earner. yesterday obama also appeared to showroom for flexibility on actually relowering those tax rates in the future. >> i don't think that the issue right now has to do with sitting in a room. the issue right now that's relevant is the acknowledgement that if we're going to raise revenues that are sufficient to balance with the very tough cuts that we've already made and the further reforms and en
was in new york. he was in america for the u.n. general assembly in september and i think wanted to come down and meet the president. and wasn't invited or that didn't happen. and then, you recall when the -- when that film that scurrilous film was made and attacks on the embassy in cairo and he was not quick to condemn the attacks and president obama let him know that the alliance was actually in question over that. but they seem to have gotten along very well over the efforts to combined effort to end the gaza conflict and we're on the phone a lot and both sides say, you know, achieved some sort of rappaport. >> thank you very much. >>> and just in, we're getting word the army private accused of leaking secrets to wick leaks is right now on the stand testifying in his defense. that's next. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next gr
as a nonmember observer state. many jewish groups denounced the u.n. action, saying it undermines future peace negotiations with israel. some u.s. christian and muslim leaders supported the move. the palestinians were not granted full u.n. membership, but their upgraded status could allow them access to other u.n. and international bodies, including the international criminal court where they could possibly bring charges against israel. the united states was one of nine nations that voted against the resolution. >>> in egypt, seven coptic christians and a controversial american pastor have been sentenced to death over an anti-islam film that sparked massive protests in several muslim countries in september. but the sentences can not be carried out since none of the eight lives in egypt. a u.s.-muslim organization urged the court to drop the charges, saying the prophet muhammed taught forgiveness. florida pastor terry jones was among those sentenced for promoting the film. in 2010, jones caused international outrage after he threatened to burn copies of the koran. >>>a neinterfaith center backe
that has tossed a country into chaos. team fox coverage continues now. jonathan hunt at the u.n. jonathan, this looks like the beginning of an end game to many. >> yeah. it certainly does. the rebels have clearly taken the decision within the past week that they cannot bring about the downfall of the assad regime without taking the battle directly to the capital damascus. they do not, however, yet have the fire power to win in one big final assault. so this is likely to be a war of attrition within damascus itself and president assad has gathered his hot best trained troops around his strong holds within the capital so this may well go on for days. butng to a lot of experts, the pressure on president assad is growing day by day. and that is why there is the concern about the use of these chemical weapons because they say in many ways now, president assad is like a cornered rat. shep? >> shepard: jonathan, still so many questions about what happens after assad. >> yeah, and that's one of the problems here for the international community. we have heard again and again just how many factions
that has something to doith iran and something else to do with the u.n. nuclear watchdog group called the iaea. just for some context here earlier this week we told you members of the iaea, which is the nuclear watchdog group for the u.n., getting their e-mails and information hacked. all signs pointed that iran was behind that. we also reported to you yesterday that the associated press has a diagram from supposedly inside iran that showed iran wanting to develop a nuclear weapon that would be three times as powerful as hiroshima. today what we're getting crossing on the wires right now the united states effectively set a march deadline for iran to start cooperating with the iaea and let the inspectors into the country for full access. the united states diplomat says if they do not do this, if iran does not start cooperating they are going to recommend that the u.n. security council take this up. now what that means and whether or not that is a credible threat to get iran to start working with this group is a big question. time will only tell. the timeline is of the utmost importance
. tom costello, nbc news, washington. >>> it was another one of those days for susan rice, the u.n. ambassador who again found herself in the middle of a power struggle between some republicans on the hill on one side, and the president, who by all accounts would like to nominate her for the next secretary of state. our chief foreign correspondent andrea mitchell has more. >> reporter: with hillary clinton nodding her approval, the president sent a strong message to republicans, don't mess with my u.n. ambassador. susan rice is extraordinary >> couldn't be prouder of the job that you have done. >> reporter: for rice, a welcome signal that her nomination is still alive, despite another brutal day on capitol hill. >> the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of the difficult presidential election campaign. >> i would just ask the president to step back for a moment, and realize that all of us here hold the secretary of state to a very different standard than most cabinet members. >> reporter: why is susan rice such a lightning rod? even a
. >>> despite another rough day of meetings with republican senators, u.n. ambassador susan rice received a new vote of confidence. this time from the president and secretary of state hillary clinton. the president called rice extraordinary during a cabinet meeting she attended. clinton led a round of applause for rice who is considered to be a front-runner to be nominated as clinton's successor. a point later touched on during a news conference. >> susan rice has done a great job as our ambassador to the united nations and, of course, this decision about my successor is up to the president. i'm very happy he has the opportunity with a second term to make a decision. >> but on capitol hill, tennessee republican senator bob corker spoke with rice wednesday and later warned the president that the job of secretary of state is held to a higher standard than that of other appointees. >>> last night on "hard ball," susan collins talked about her meeting with ambassador rice. she says why she is troubled about rice's comments on the attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya. >> she says that she r
as a result of the u.n. vote. the palestinians say it will enhance the prospects of the two states living side by side. >> this enhanced status will not change much on the ground right now. but it will change the bid for a fully independent and sovereign state. they could theoretically pursue claims against israel's occupation in international criminal court. it has been a dramatic disaster for israel. ministers having to explain to their own people tonight why only a handful of nations, including the u.s., were backing down in the voting against the palestinian bid, which israel said was a move against peace. >> one thing is certain, we are not obligated anymore by any agreements with the palestinians. we can act according to our own interests. >> the people have renewed hope. the palestinian leaders have missed many opportunities before. can they push on from here and reach the elusive peace agreement that would put an israeli and palestinian state side by side? >> i am showing to now by a senior fellow from the middle east council on foreign relations and formerly of the state department. t
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